So I Became a Librarian

So Overdue You Should Charge Me Late Fees

I probably should have made a post like this many months ago, but better late than never, right?!

This tumblr has always been a side tumblr, intended for resumes or what have you because I was uncomfortable linking to my personal/main tumblr in professional spheres. But since I have two jobs now and don’t even have time for one tumblr let alone two, I will not be posting to this one anymore. 

I would be happy to have any of you follow me at my main blog, but totally understand if you don’t want to, because it’s only maybe 20% library related and doesn’t even get updated all that often anymore because of the whole two jobs thing.

Either way, it was nice while it lasted and keep on tumblin’!

laboratoryequipment:

Nutrition Labels to Get First Makeover in 20 YearsAfter 20 years, the nutrition facts label on the back of food packages is getting a makeover. Knowledge about nutrition has evolved since the early 1990s, and the Food and Drug Administration says the labels need to reflect that.Nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list for label changes. The number of calories should be more prominent, they say, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included. They also want more clarity on serving sizes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/nutrition-labels-get-first-makeover-20-years

laboratoryequipment:

Nutrition Labels to Get First Makeover in 20 Years

After 20 years, the nutrition facts label on the back of food packages is getting a makeover. Knowledge about nutrition has evolved since the early 1990s, and the Food and Drug Administration says the labels need to reflect that.

Nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list for label changes. The number of calories should be more prominent, they say, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included. They also want more clarity on serving sizes.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/nutrition-labels-get-first-makeover-20-years

(via oplik)

Impact Factor and the Future of Medical Journals - Haider Javed Warraich - The Atlantic

Some research publications are getting away from flawed measures of influence that make it easy to game the system.

gov-info:

NARA, NLM, & LOC Gov Resource: Digital Preservation in a Box! 
Digital Preservation in a Box, for those who may be unfamiliar, is a compilation of resources from many different organizations, all available in one virtual place.  It’s been around for a little over a year.  To give a brief background, the Box was produced by the National Digital Stewardship Alliance , specifically the Outreach working group, so this was, and is, very much a collaborative effort with our partners in this group.  The initial aim was to consolidate many resources into one convenient place, providing access to basic information geared towards library professionals and educators.
So, what are some specific uses for Digital Preservation in a Box?  Here are four possibilities:
You are taking a digital curation course in library school and you need to find lots of resources to help with your project or research.  (The Digital Preservation 101 section is a good place to start).
You work in a library, museum or other cultural institution and you have been tasked with starting a digital preservation effort.  (Again, see Digital Preservation 101)
You are teaching a college course which includes digital preservation as a component and you are looking for classroom resources. (See the Resources for Educators, and the story below about Dr. Jane Zhang of Catholic University)
You are preparing a presentation on the value of digital preservation.  According to Butch Lazorchak, co-chair of the NDSA outreach working group, “The Box provides a ready-to-use set of resources that help make it easy to talk about digital stewardship.”
These are just a few ways in which Digital Preservation in a Box could be of use.
At this year’s Digital Preservation 2013 conference, I had a chance to present our NDSA poster on this resource.   A lively poster session it was, too – there was a steady stream of attendees who came by to talk about it.  During these conversations, I was pleased to hear one of two things:  either people had used it over the past year and liked it, or, they didn’t know about it, but now they want to use it!  If any of you have just started using this resource, we’d love to hear from you about your experience.
The Box content is organized into some basic sections, each containing links to a variety of resources:
Digital Preservation 101 – contains a wide range of information, with links to tutorials, videos, blogs, to help provide some basic context.  It also includes an overall definition of digital preservation: “the series of managed activities necessary to ensure meaningful continued access, for as long as it is required, to digital objects and materials.”
Preservation by Format – includes links to suggested approaches for preserving photographs, audio, video, email, documents, and websites.  Much of this is focused on smaller, personal collections.
Digital Storage, Cloud computing and Personal Backup – includes links to basic information on cloud storage and other backup options, as well as a timeline history of digital storage.
Resources for Educators – provides curriculum guidance, lesson plans and teaching materials relating to digital preservation and use of the Box materials.  The class syllabi alone provide a good overview of the digital preservation process, complete with useful reading lists.
As an example of using the Box as an educational tool, Dr. Jane Zhang, Assistant Professor in the Department of Library and Information Science at Catholic University of America (and member of the NDSA outreach working group), created a project for her Digital Curation course that included work with the Box.   The students utilized the box materials, suggested additional resources, and presented a public workshop.  The experience was described first hand in a previous blog post by one of the participating students.
In addition to the above, the Box also includes other sections for glossaries, lists of tools, marketing and outreach, event guidance and basic digitization.
And don’t miss the The Digital Preservation Business Case Toolkit

gov-info:

NARA, NLM, & LOC Gov Resource: Digital Preservation in a Box! 

Digital Preservation in a Box, for those who may be unfamiliar, is a compilation of resources from many different organizations, all available in one virtual place.  It’s been around for a little over a year.  To give a brief background, the Box was produced by the National Digital Stewardship Alliance , specifically the Outreach working group, so this was, and is, very much a collaborative effort with our partners in this group.  The initial aim was to consolidate many resources into one convenient place, providing access to basic information geared towards library professionals and educators.

So, what are some specific uses for Digital Preservation in a Box?  Here are four possibilities:

  1. You are taking a digital curation course in library school and you need to find lots of resources to help with your project or research.  (The Digital Preservation 101 section is a good place to start).
  2. You work in a library, museum or other cultural institution and you have been tasked with starting a digital preservation effort.  (Again, see Digital Preservation 101)
  3. You are teaching a college course which includes digital preservation as a component and you are looking for classroom resources. (See the Resources for Educators, and the story below about Dr. Jane Zhang of Catholic University)
  4. You are preparing a presentation on the value of digital preservation.  According to Butch Lazorchak, co-chair of the NDSA outreach working group, “The Box provides a ready-to-use set of resources that help make it easy to talk about digital stewardship.”

These are just a few ways in which Digital Preservation in a Box could be of use.

At this year’s Digital Preservation 2013 conference, I had a chance to present our NDSA poster on this resource.   A lively poster session it was, too – there was a steady stream of attendees who came by to talk about it.  During these conversations, I was pleased to hear one of two things:  either people had used it over the past year and liked it, or, they didn’t know about it, but now they want to use it!  If any of you have just started using this resource, we’d love to hear from you about your experience.

The Box content is organized into some basic sections, each containing links to a variety of resources:

Digital Preservation 101 – contains a wide range of information, with links to tutorials, videos, blogs, to help provide some basic context.  It also includes an overall definition of digital preservation: “the series of managed activities necessary to ensure meaningful continued access, for as long as it is required, to digital objects and materials.”

Preservation by Format – includes links to suggested approaches for preserving photographs, audio, video, email, documents, and websites.  Much of this is focused on smaller, personal collections.

Digital Storage, Cloud computing and Personal Backup – includes links to basic information on cloud storage and other backup options, as well as a timeline history of digital storage.

Resources for Educators – provides curriculum guidance, lesson plans and teaching materials relating to digital preservation and use of the Box materials.  The class syllabi alone provide a good overview of the digital preservation process, complete with useful reading lists.

As an example of using the Box as an educational tool, Dr. Jane Zhang, Assistant Professor in the Department of Library and Information Science at Catholic University of America (and member of the NDSA outreach working group), created a project for her Digital Curation course that included work with the Box.   The students utilized the box materials, suggested additional resources, and presented a public workshop.  The experience was described first hand in a previous blog post by one of the participating students.

In addition to the above, the Box also includes other sections for glossaries, lists of tools, marketing and outreach, event guidance and basic digitization.

And don’t miss the The Digital Preservation Business Case Toolkit

(via extinctathon)

Shameless Tumblarians Promotion

laura-in-libraryland:

If you are an academic librarian-type in the Northeast US who is looking for a great professional development opportunity, why not check out our Tumblarian-produced event?

Caro Pinto [libarchivist], Dawn Stahura [itakeupspace] and I will be at UMass Amherst on December 9th for a workshop on building campus relationships to support student outreach and engagement.

If you have some funding to attend conferences this fall, perhaps you can consider this one? Even if you cannot attend, can you spread the word to those who might?

Thanks all, and happy Monday!



I’m not sure I’ll be able to go, but I’m definitely passing this along to my director because she’s been talking recently about wanting to partner with Student Affairs. And of course reblogging for exposure!

Rivers by Michael Farris Smith
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When the hurricanes finally cease to stop and the storms become too much for the southeastern region of the United States, it’s not too much of a leap to suppose that the government might do what they can to coax everyone out of there and then declare an arbitrary line, above which the government will continue to operate, and below which lawlessness and firearms will reign supreme. In (what once was) Mississippi, a man named Cohen chose to stay below the Line and ride out the storm because he can’t quite let go of what he once had. And, when Rivers begins, other than a rain that never seems to stop, it doesn’t seem all that hopeless of an existence. He had a nice horse and a loyal dog (both of which just showed up one day), and his house is still standing. He has a Jeep that runs and access to supplies from a man named Charlie who makes the drive back and forth from above to below the line. It’s not ideal, but for Cohen it is better than the alternative.

Until one day, despite his intuition telling him not to do it, Cohen helps out a young woman and a boy who are hurt and claim to just need a ride. What ensues is a long, stormy journey to get above the Line and start over, full of religious zealots, treasure hunts, dozens of tense shootouts, and too many near death moments to count. You can feel the desperation and the danger as heavy as a waterlogged sweatshirt, which is why the moments of goodness and sweetness feel all the warmer. It would be so easy for Cohen to walk away, but he doesn’t.

Michael Farris Smith is a great and versatile writer. The characters, their dialogue, the actions scenes, the storms… it’s a recipe to not only keep you reading for the plot, but to get you emotionally involved. Foreshadowing is a frequently used device, and Smith wields it deftly. He also never lets up. In fact, in the moments that the central characters are meant to be given a well deserved break, you can’t help but feel that they are just one move away from some new horror or danger. And while the storms are a real threat, time and again Smith proves that it’s the people you have to watch out for when a civilization collapses. That’s why a story like Rivers is so much scarier than a zombie tale: zombies aren’t real, but desperate and dangerous people are. And Smith’s vision of the future is grounded in so much realism that suspending your disbelief is easy. Too easy. This is a book that will leave a mark.

I can see how some readers might be turned off by the frequently used trope of a dead wife/child to propel the male protagonist’s journey, but I found that it didn’t bother me as much as I thought it might for a few reasons. First, Cohen’s wife is a fully realized character, albeit through Cohen’s memories. Second, Smith treats other female characters with great care, giving them depth and individual personalities and their own desires and goals. Though Cohen remains the central characters, parts of the book belong just as much to Mariposa, as well as Kris and Nadine. [Spoiler redacted.]

Also, how great is that cover art?!

Definitely in my top 10 for all the books I read this year, and it may be one of my favorites of all time. Considering buying a paper copy in case I ever want to read it paperback style. Highly recommended for teens and adults who like action, suspense and a little bit of mystery wrapped in a post-apocalyptic shell. Bonus for readers who like Southern writers or stories set in the South.

View all my reviews

MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

MaddAddam is a satisfying and uplifting (hard to believe, I know) conclusion to the trilogy that Atwood began so many years ago. Just as The Year of the Flood gave us more detail of the world before it was reshaped by Crake, MaddAddam continues this expansion of detail by fleshing out the back story of Adam One and Zeb. TYotF showed there was more to them and their involvement with the Paradice Project, and the story of their relationship forms the kernel of this novel.

Complete review on Goodreads. (linking because the spoiler container doesn’t work on tumblr.)

libraryfuture:

I am a {Social} Librarian - Infographic. 
Never underestimate the power of the {social} Librarian! 
Info graphic by Joe Murphy and @Library_connect 
#sociallibrarian

libraryfuture:

I am a {Social} Librarian - Infographic. 

Never underestimate the power of the {social} Librarian! 

Info graphic by Joe Murphy and @Library_connect 

#sociallibrarian

(via dustyoldlibrarybook)

A library of a different sort brought to you by the Harry Potter Alliance!
(via How to cite a Tweet and other social media in a medical journal)
A little something I came across at work today. More info at the source.

(via How to cite a Tweet and other social media in a medical journal)

A little something I came across at work today. More info at the source.